Tassel of the Cloak

Tassel of the CloakGod is in everything, be it sports or music or history or business or wine-making or church or whatever. Everywhere we look there is a spiritual metaphor to be found. Some metaphors may be hidden, some overt. I will attempt to point them out to you. That is the purpose of these laconic reflections. They are mostly intended to be fun and interesting. Perhaps, though, the reflections will provide you some guidance. Perhaps they will lead you to see everything through a spiritual lens, thus appreciating Catholicism all the more. When Jay Cutler throws a Hail Mary at the end of the half, might you move beyond your frustration with the Bears' offensive ineptitude and think of the Blessed Mother? Just an example.

These reflections will only be an introduction to deeper spiritual and theological truths. Hence the title, The Tassel of the Cloak. When David cuts off the tassel of Saul's cloak and shows it to him (cf. 1 Sam 24), Saul realizes that David is not his enemy. That moves them into a new relationship. Likewise, the hemorrhaging woman's grasping of the tassel on Christ's cloak in Luke 8:44 opens the door to her healing and conversion. The tassel was merely an entryway. The mundane anecdotes and simple spiritual lessons I provide are, in my opinion, the tassel. There's much more to Christ's Cloak. I hope you will experience it. So, please, go ahead and "Touch the Hem of His Garment." That is, by the way, the title of a Sam Cooke song.

Rock On, Journey

The classic rock band from the 1970s and 80s, Journey, is not a Christian rock band, but one could look at the titles of some of the songs and see an implicit spirituality.  There is Faithfully, Open Arms, The Wheel in the Sky, and, of course their most famous song of all, Don't Stop Believin'.  Interestingly enough, the composer of all of those above songs was the keyboardist for Journey, Jonathan Cain.

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The Miracle of Hiroshima

On August 6th, 1945, the Enola Gay dropped "Little Boy" on Hiroshima, killing instantly 140,000 people and completely obliterating everything within a mile and a half radius.  Buildings ten miles away were brought down from the blast.  Over 200,000 more would die shortly thereafter from radiation.  The atomic bomb destroyed just about everything and everyone.  Just about.   

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St. Teresa of Avila

St. Teresa of Avila was asked to write about prayer, and so she came up with an image of a garden.  Watering is a particularly pertinent chore this time of year, and one I particularly hated as a child, so perhaps the great mystic's words can be of help.

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Mary, the Mirror of the Church

Karst is a type of terrain characterized by hidden rivers and lakes.  Typically the terrain consists of limestone, as this easily erodes, and the section of stone underneath the surface has been dissolved.  Most cave systems in the world are karst areas.  Likewise, there are "karstic" rivers, which can flow below the ground at points.  If the soil is dense, the water will be on the surface; if porous, it will be underground. 

 

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The Routine of Love

Do you have daily routines that ground you in something you consider important?  A ritual of sorts that makes you recall your motivating factor or your original desire for something or someone?  I, for instance, try each morning as soon as I wake up to make a sign of the cross and then nod in the direction of the only picture I have in my bedroom: that of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.  It reminds me of why I am a priest: because I love Jesus Christ more than anything in the world. 

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